Show Notes: Sheds, Fleas, Selling and more – On the House

Show Notes: Sheds, Fleas, Selling and more

By on March 12, 2016

Is the house getting to small? Need some away space without leaving home, a hide-out? How about a new She Sheds – the new mancave. Home Depot is selling them, so they must be in!  Are the fleas showing up with the warm weather? 

 

Thank you to our guests:

Ron and Paul Rives, the Legal Tool Chest:

www.riveslaw.com  925.432-3511

 

What’s The Best Time To Sell A House?

Spring is the Super bowl of Real Estate

Traditionally, spring is the hottest season for real estate. Sales peak in April and May and stay strong in June and July. It’s a good season for families to move, between school terms and while the weather is warm. People have just received their tax refunds, which they can use to help finance a down payment. And the nice weather and beautiful flowers in spring and early summer make it a great time to show your home.  

In fact, a full 60 percent of America’s moves take place in the summer. But closing a sale can take weeks, so it’s a good idea to list your home early in the season.

https://www.lendingtree.com/mortgage/the-best-time-to-sell-your-house-article

 

Tips To Keep Those Carpets Clean

After you have had the winter mud and soil removed from your carpet by a professional, here are the basics for keeping your carpet cleaner longer:

Every good housekeeper knows carpets need to be vacuumed once a week and more often in areas of heavy traffic. Clean carpets will last longer. Don’t forget the edges and under furniture.

One quick swipe with the vacuum is not enough. Go over each section of carpeting several times and slowly to allow the vacuum to remove all the ground-in dust and dirt.

Vacuum walk areas with a crisscross pattern of overlapping strokes.

Change vacuum  bags  before they are full and add some baking soda to the bag to fight odors.

Always clean up drips and spills immediately. For spot-cleaning, mix 1 tablespoon each, of ammonia, white vinegar and liquid dish detergent with 1 cup of cold water in a plastic quart container. Close the container and shake it until it foams. Put some on the spot, dab or brush, and blot dry.

https://onthehouse.com/5-tips-keep-carpets-clean/

 

Spring Time Is Flea Time!  Prevention First, Cure Later

Truth be told, if you take careful measures to prevent flea infestation, you may never need to look for a cure. If you have a lawn or a yard, begin your preventive measures here and then work your way up going to your pets and then your home.

You can use pesticides that can effectively keep fleas at bay but won’t be harmful to your plants or your pets. Most of the time, these pesticides do not only work on fleas but they are also effective in preventing tick infestation.

For your pets, you can start them with a flea collar or topical flea repellant . These products are not only good at discouraging fleas from inhabiting your pets but these are also effective in killing fleas, should any happen to be on your pet already.

Use flea shampoo regularly

As for your home regularly vacuuming your carpets, drapes and upholstered furniture. Make it a point to regularly change your bedroom linens and launder soiled clothes weekly. If fleas happen to be lurking in your laundry pile or bed covers; washing them on a regular basis will kill the fleas.

http://www.fleasinhouse.org/flea-season/

 

Do You Have A “She-Shed”?

What exactly is a she shed?  

It’s an alliterative way of referring to a woman’s backyard retreat. It can be a potting shed, an art studio, a tree house, a converted playhouse, a cottage, a greenhouse, a camper, a converted chicken coop — basically any sort of detached outbuilding. Basically a big girl playhouse.

What happens in a she shed? That stays in the she shed. I’m kidding. Its primary purpose is to serve as an escape from the noise, the projects and the other distractions in the house. Potting plants, throwing pots, reading, napping, blogging, knitting, woodworking, writing, catching up on some old-fashioned letter writing — whatever artistic pursuits, hobbies, work or leisurely activities a woman enjoys, she can do them in peace in her she shed.

Does a woman have to build and outfit her she shed without any male help? No. While many women are doing it for themselves, some have had help from their brothers, male friends, contractors and husbands. However, the she shed is always built according to the woman’s vision.

Does a she shed have to be wired and plumbed? No. Sunlight, candlelight and perhaps a garden hose provide all of the technology the basic she shed needs. Anything more elaborate than that is a luxury.

Are men and children allowed in the she shed? Of course. While these getaways are built to the woman’s vision, some of the builders have done such a thorough job of creating a dream space that now guests actually pay to stay in them!

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/47242579/list/11-nominees-for-the-she-shed-hall-of-fame

 

Things To Do When Daylight Saving Time Starts

Changing the clocks isn’t the only thing to do around the house

Change The Batteries in Your Smoke and Carbon Monoxide

Detectors:

Take the time to make sure your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide

detectors are in working order and have fresh batteries. Flames can

consume a home in as little as five minutes, and the risk of dying in a

fire is cut in half in homes with working smoke alarms. Better yet,

invest in 10-Year Battery Smoke Alarm/Heat Detector.

Clean the Dryer Duct and Filter: 

Clean the lint screen thoroughly after every load. If it’s filled an

clogged with lint, the air won’t circulate and the cloths won’t dry, and

the dryer runs far longer, which wears it out faster ad wastes lots of

energy dollars in the process. What’s more, dryer lint is a big fire

hazard. Use a duct cleaning brush to clean the dryer duct least twice

annually

Replace or Clean Filters Around Your House:

You should inspect the filters in your heating and air-conditioning units to make your systems are still running well, but also check the water filter in your fridge and HEPA filter in your vacuum.

Check Your Emergency Kit.

If you’ve depleted your supply of flashlight batteries, bandage, and other just-in-case items over the past six months, use this time to restock.

 

 

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