Smoke Detectors and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Buying Guide - On the House

Smoke Detectors and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Buying Guide

By on March 17, 2018
detector

Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms are two tools that can help you protect your home and family from these threats, even when they occur in remote areas of the home or at night when everyone is asleep. You can purchase the devices separately or as combination units. Here’s you’re guide!

Power Options 

Both smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms are available in hardwired models that connect to your home wiring or battery-operated models. Some smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms feature built-in power cells that are designed to last the life of the device. 

 

Device Lifespan 

The lifespans of smoke detectors, carbon monoxide alarms and combination units differ based on factors such as device type, model and where they’re installed. In general, replace a smoke detector after no more than 10 years and a carbon monoxide alarm after no more than 5 years. Combination unit lifespan typically ranges between 5 and 7 years.  

 

Features and Specifications 

  •  Photoelectric and ionization sensors are two sensor types for smoke detectors. Photoelectric smoke detectors are typically more sensitive to particles generated by fires that smolder, such as those ignited by a cigarette in a bed or upholstery. Ionization smoke detectors tend to be more sensitive to particles generated by flaming fires, such as burning paper or grease. 
  • Voice notification on carbon monoxide alarms and combination units lets you program the location of the device from preset selections. When the alarm sounds, the voice warning indicates the location and, for combination units, the type of threat detected. 
  •  A linking feature allows you to connect compatible units so all linked units sound an alarm when one detects a threat. This functionality can warn of hazards in remote areas of the house. If you install units that link wirelessly, pay attention to the range and placement restrictions for the linking feature. 
  • Home management system compatibilitylets you connect the device to some home management systems to send mobile alerts when the alarm activates. 
  • A silencing feature allows you to temporarily stop an unwanted alarm for a specific time period. 
  • Audible status alerts, such as low-battery and end-of-life, let you know when the device needs attention.
  • A display screenshows status information such as battery level, low-battery and end-of-life for the device. When a carbon monoxide alarm sounds, some models display the carbon monoxide level recorded and, for combination units, the threat  Some carbon monoxide alarms also display peak carbon monoxide levels recorded over a specific period of time. 
  • Low-profile models, micro-design modelsand finish options allow the device to blend with your home décor. 

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for placement of smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms.  

 

Source:

https://www.lowes.com/projects/utility-and-storage/carbon-monoxide-detector-buying-guide/project 

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